Tag Archives: roth ira

Strategies to Pass on Wealth to Heirs

Strategies to Pass on Wealth to Heirs

Strategies to Pass Wealth to Heirs Individuals with significant assets should take advantage of proven tax strategies such as gifting and direct payments to educational institutions to transfer wealth to heirs tax-free, as well as minimize estate taxes. Additional opportunities are available as well, thanks to low interest rates and a volatile stock market.

Let’s take a look at some of them.

Gifting

The annual gift tax exclusion provides a simple, effective way of cutting estate taxes and shifting income to heirs. For example, in 2021, you can make annual gifts of up to $15,000 ($30,000 for a married couple) to as many donees as you desire. The $15,000 is excluded from the federal gift tax so that you will not incur gift tax liability. Furthermore, each $15,000 you give away during your lifetime reduces your estate for federal estate tax purposes. However, any amounts above this limit will reduce an individual’s federal lifetime exemption and require filing a gift tax return.

Direct Payments

Direct payments for medical or educational purposes indirectly shift income to heirs; however, it only works if the payments are made directly to the qualifying educational institution or medical provider. This strategy allows you to give more than the annual gifting limit of $15,000 per donee. For example, if you’re a grandparent, you can pay tuition directly to your grandchild’s boarding school, college, or university. Room and board, books, supplies, or other nontuition expenses are not covered. Similarly, they can make direct payments to a hospital or medical provider, but medical expenses reimbursed by insurance are not covered, however.

Loans to Family Members

This strategy works by loaning cash to family members at low interest rates, which is then invested with the goal of reaping significant profits down the road. With mid and long-term applicable federal rates (AFR) rates for October 2021, as low as 0.91 and 1.72 percent, respectively, heirs can lock in these rates for many years – three to nine years (mid-term) and nine to more than 20 years (long-term).

Grantor Retained Annuity Trust (GRAT)

Another relatively low-risk strategy is the grantor retained annuity trust (GRAT), where the donor transfers assets to an irrevocable trust and receives an annuity payment back from the trust each year. This strategy enables heirs to profit from their investments long-term if returns are higher than the IRS interest rate. Now that IRS interest rates are so low, this is easier than ever to do. In October 2021, the interest rate used to value certain charitable interests in trusts such as the GRAT is 1.00 percent.

Roth IRA Conversions

Contributions to a traditional IRA are made pre-tax, which means distributions are considered taxable income; however, the tax is paid upfront with a Roth IRA, and distributions are completely exempt from income tax. This feature makes converting a traditional IRA to Roth IRA and rolling it over to an heir an attractive option, especially during a financial crisis. The conversion is treated as a rollover where the trustee of the traditional IRA is directed to transfer an amount from the traditional IRA to the trustee of the Roth IRA. The account owner pays income tax on the amount rolled over in the year the account is converted, which allows the account to accumulate assets tax-free and future distributions are tax-free.

To learn more about these and other tax strategies related to wealth management, please call Lahrmer & Company LLC at (866) 474-1238 or email office@lahrmercpa.com and speak to a tax professional who can assist you.

What Is a Designated Roth Account?

Roth IRA contributionsMany 401(k) plans allow taxpayers to make Roth contributions as long as the plan has a designated Roth account. Your plan may also allow you to transfer amounts to the designated Roth account in the plan or borrow money.

Check with your employer to find out if your 401(k), 403(b) or 457 governmental plan has a designated Roth account and whether it allows in-plan Roth rollovers or loans.

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Taking Early Withdrawals From Retirement Accounts

early withdrawalWhile taking money out of a retirement fund before age 59-1/2 is usually not recommended, in certain cases, it may be unavoidable, especially during times of economic crisis. If you need cash and have a retirement fund you can tap, here’s what you need to know. Continue reading

Year-End Tax Planning for Individuals

year-end tax planningWith the end of the year fast approaching, now is the time to take a closer look at tax planning strategies you can use to minimize your tax burden for next year. Continue reading

Retirement Contribution Limits Announced for 2019

bigstock-Couples-At-The-Beach-Holding-H-4134051 (1)Dollar limitations for pension plans and other retirement-related items for 2019 are as follows:

In general, income ranges for determining eligibility to make deductible contributions to traditional Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs), to contribute to Roth IRAs, and to claim the saver’s credit all increased for 2019. The contribution limit for employees who participate in 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans, and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan also increases from $18,500 to $19,000. Contribution limits for SIMPLE retirement accounts for self-employed persons increase in 2019 as well – from $12,500 to $13,000. Continue reading

The Reasons for a Roth Solo 401(k)


Solo Roth IRAHere is a way for a solopreneur to save much more for retirement. 
Provided by Gateway Financial’s Todd Pouliot, AIF.

Self-employed? Seeking to ramp up your retirement savings? You should look at the potential of the Roth Solo 401(k). If you are a high-earning solopreneur, this savings vehicle may be a great choice, because it allows you to make both employee and employer contributions to a 401(k) account in the same year. Continue reading