Tag Archives: taxpayer

Special Tax Benefits For Members Of The Military

Special Tax Benefits For Members Of The Military

Military personnel and their families face unique life challenges with their duties, expenses, and transitions. As such, military members may qualify for tax benefits unavailable to civilians. For example, they don’t have to pay taxes on some types of income. Special rules may lower the tax they owe or allow them more time to file and pay their federal taxes.

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What To Do If You Missed The April Tax Deadline

What To Do If You Miss The April Tax Deadline

What To Do If You Missed The April Tax Deadline

Monday, April 18, 2022, was the tax deadline for most taxpayers to file their tax returns, but if you haven’t filed a 2021 tax return yet, it’s not too late. Here’s what you need to do:

First, gather any information related to income and deductions for the tax years for which a return must be filed, then contact us at the office of Lahrmer & Company LLC at (866) 474-1238 or office@lahrmercpa.com.

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Tax Return Tips For Last-Minute Filers

Tax Return Tips For Last-Minute Filers

When it comes to working on your taxes, earlier is better, but many people find preparing their tax return stressful and frustrating and wait until the last minute. If you’ve been procrastinating on filing your tax return this year, here are eight tips that might help.

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Working Remotely Could Affect Your Taxes

Working Remotely Could Affect Your Taxes

Working Remotely Could Affect Your Taxes

When COVID-19 struck, many employers quickly switched to a work-from-home model for their employees. Many of them began working in a state other than where their office was located. While some workers have returned to their offices, as the pandemic drags on, more offices continue to work remotely with no back-to-office dates in sight.

If you’re working remotely from a location in a different state (or country) from that of your office, then you may be wondering if you will have to pay income tax in multiple jurisdictions or whether you will need to file income tax returns in both states. Here’s what you should know:

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What's new on IRS form 1040

What’s New for IRS Form 1040 This Year

What's New for IRS Form 1040 This Year

If you’ve gathered your tax documents and are ready to tackle your tax return, there’s one more step you should take: becoming familiar with what’s new on the 2021 Form 1040. While the format of Form 1040 and its schedules remain similar to 2020, there are several changes. Many of these changes can be attributed to the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (ARP).

Some are more familiar to taxpayers, including charitable contributions, advance child tax credits, and economic impact payments (mentioned above). Others might not be as well-known. Let’s take a look at nine of them:

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What To Know About Keeping Good Tax Records

What To Know About Keeping Good Tax Records

Tax season is upon us. For many people that means scrambling to collect receipts, mileage logs, and other tax-related documents needed to prepare their tax returns. If this describes you, chances are, you’re wishing you’d kept on top of it during the year so you could avoid this scenario yet again. With this in mind, here are seven suggestions to help taxpayers like you keep good records throughout the year:

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Defer Capital Gains

Defer Capital Gains Using Like-Kind Exchanges

Defer Capital Gains If you’re a savvy investor, you probably know that you must generally report as income any mutual fund distributions, whether you reinvest them or exchange shares in one fund for shares of another. In other words, you must report and pay any capital gains tax owed.

But if real estate’s your game, did you know that it’s possible to defer capital gains by taking advantage of a tax break that allows you to swap investment property on a tax-deferred basis?

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make a tax payment

What are Estimated Tax Payments?

Estimated tax is the method used to pay tax on income that is not subject to withholding. This includes income from self-employment, interest, dividends, alimony, and rent and gains from the sale of assets, prizes, and awards. You also may have to pay an estimated tax if the amount of income tax being withheld from your salary, pension, or other income is not enough. Here’s what you should know about estimated tax payments: Continue reading

expat compliance for US

Expat Compliance With U.S. Tax Filing Obligations

expat complianceTaxpayers who relinquish citizenship without complying with their U.S. tax obligations are subject to the significant tax consequences of the U.S. expatriation tax regime. If you’re an expat who has relinquished–or intends to relinquish–your U.S. citizenship but still has U.S. tax filing obligations (including owing back taxes), you’ll be relieved to know there are IRS procedures in place that allow you to come into compliance and receive relief for any back taxes owed. Let’s take a look: Continue reading